Victory Safety and Training Saskatoon
 
RSS Feed
Find us on Facebook
Toll Free: 1 (855) 649-0030
Home
Courses
Register Online
Calendar
Safety and Training Resources
Safety Products & Services
About Us
Contact Us
Safety and Training Resources

CAUSE OF INJURY OR LOSS: When lowering (or raising) wings for rig-out, fall protection was not worn. No engineered fall protection system on substructure.

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 31, 2018 09:59

Tags:

First Aid Tips Heat-related emergencies

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 31, 2018 09:59
Heat-related emergencies occur when the body becomes dehydrated, which may result in an increased body temperature. Heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke, can happen to anyone who stays in the summer heat and sun for too long. Young children, the elderly, those with chronic illnesses such as heart disease, and those taking certain medications can become ill in hot, humid weather faster than healthy adults. It is important for everyone enjoying the outdoors to know how to prevent heat emergencies, recognize when someone has been in the heat for too long, and be able to provide help when needed. The Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Emergencies Cramps or muscle tightening, usually in the legs and abdomen but they can be in other parts of the body Headache Nausea Dizziness, weakness, and feeling faint Skin that is redder or paler than usual, or moist skin Rapid shallow breathing Irritable, bizarre, or aggressive behaviour How to Help Move the person to a cooler location Give the person cool water to drink in sips Have the person loosen any tight clothing Fan the person Put cool water on the person’s skin If the person’s condition is severe, put covered ice packs in each armpit and on the back of the person’s neck Call for help (EMS/9-1-1) When you’re hot you sweat more than normal, so you need to drink more to replace the water your body is losing. Drink plenty of cool fluids, even if you do not feel thirsty, but avoid caffeine and alcohol. They can cause dehydration, which stops your body from controlling its temperature properly. Preventing Heat-Related Emergencies Drink plenty of cool fluids — this is the most important step you can take. Avoid being outside during the hottest part of the day. Know the humidex rating — it combines the temperature and humidity to indicate how hot, humid weather feels to the average person. Wear light, loose clothing to let air circulate and heat escape and always wear a hat. Apply sunscreen (with SPF 15 or higher) as sunburned skin reduces the body’s ability to cool itself. Slow down your activities as it gets hotter and don’t work, exercise, or play for too long at a time. Take a lot of breaks in a cool or shady area to let your body cool off. This will help if you do need to be outside when it’s really hot.

Tags:

First Aid Tips Heat-related emergencies

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 31, 2018 09:45
Heat-related emergencies occur when the body becomes dehydrated, which may result in an increased body temperature. Heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke, can happen to anyone who stays in the summer heat and sun for too long. Young children, the elderly, those with chronic illnesses such as heart disease, and those taking certain medications can become ill in hot, humid weather faster than healthy adults. It is important for everyone enjoying the outdoors to know how to prevent heat emergencies, recognize when someone has been in the heat for too long, and be able to provide help when needed. The Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Emergencies Cramps or muscle tightening, usually in the legs and abdomen but they can be in other parts of the body Headache Nausea Dizziness, weakness, and feeling faint Skin that is redder or paler than usual, or moist skin Rapid shallow breathing Irritable, bizarre, or aggressive behaviour How to Help Move the person to a cooler location Give the person cool water to drink in sips Have the person loosen any tight clothing Fan the person Put cool water on the person’s skin If the person’s condition is severe, put covered ice packs in each armpit and on the back of the person’s neck Call for help (EMS/9-1-1) When you’re hot you sweat more than normal, so you need to drink more to replace the water your body is losing. Drink plenty of cool fluids, even if you do not feel thirsty, but avoid caffeine and alcohol. They can cause dehydration, which stops your body from controlling its temperature properly. Preventing Heat-Related Emergencies Drink plenty of cool fluids — this is the most important step you can take. Avoid being outside during the hottest part of the day. Know the humidex rating — it combines the temperature and humidity to indicate how hot, humid weather feels to the average person. Wear light, loose clothing to let air circulate and heat escape and always wear a hat. Apply sunscreen (with SPF 15 or higher) as sunburned skin reduces the body’s ability to cool itself. Slow down your activities as it gets hotter and don’t work, exercise, or play for too long at a time. Take a lot of breaks in a cool or shady area to let your body cool off. This will help if you do need to be outside when it’s really hot.

Tags:

Safety Program Development

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 17, 2018 10:23

Victory Safety and Training is now offering Safety Program Development/Assessment to help you ensure your company is compliant with applicable regulations. If your company may require these services or you would like to know more please give us a call to book your assessment.

Tags:

Confidential, Personal Testing

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 3, 2018 15:50
Confidential, Personal Testing When you need to know the truth, plain and simple. We fully appreciate the issues around privacy and timing. Every case is managed in a professional, confidential, non-judgmental manner. We book same-day appointments.

Tags:

General Mine Safety Awareness (GMSA) is a 24-hour training

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 3, 2018 15:31
Mine Safety Classroom Training General Mine Safety Awareness (GMSA) is a 24-hour training course required for any contractor working on a mine site in Saskatchewan as of June 30, 2018. This is a Saskatchewan Mining Association (SMA) requirement. The program provides an overview of mine safety through 13 modules: 1. Saskatchewan Mining Regulations Employment Act 2. Hazard recognition 3. Personal protective equipment 4. Safe use of hand and power tools 5. Safe use of scaffolding and ladders 6. Controlled energy 7. Fire safety 8. Environmental safety 9. Reporting incidents 10. Ground control awareness 11. Self-rescue techniques 12. Asbestos awareness 13. Fit for duty and drug and alcohol testing The course is delivered over three days. Additional courses may be scheduled according to demand.

Tags:

Register for A Course Online

Quick Links

© 2018 Victory Safety & Training. All Rights Reserved.   About Us   |   Contact Us   |   Saskatoon Website Design by Trio Web Design   |   Log in