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CAUSE OF INJURY OR LOSS: When lowering (or raising) wings for rig-out, fall protection was not worn. No engineered fall protection system on substructure.

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 31, 2018 09:59

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First Aid Tips Heat-related emergencies

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 31, 2018 09:59
Heat-related emergencies occur when the body becomes dehydrated, which may result in an increased body temperature. Heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke, can happen to anyone who stays in the summer heat and sun for too long. Young children, the elderly, those with chronic illnesses such as heart disease, and those taking certain medications can become ill in hot, humid weather faster than healthy adults. It is important for everyone enjoying the outdoors to know how to prevent heat emergencies, recognize when someone has been in the heat for too long, and be able to provide help when needed. The Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Emergencies Cramps or muscle tightening, usually in the legs and abdomen but they can be in other parts of the body Headache Nausea Dizziness, weakness, and feeling faint Skin that is redder or paler than usual, or moist skin Rapid shallow breathing Irritable, bizarre, or aggressive behaviour How to Help Move the person to a cooler location Give the person cool water to drink in sips Have the person loosen any tight clothing Fan the person Put cool water on the person’s skin If the person’s condition is severe, put covered ice packs in each armpit and on the back of the person’s neck Call for help (EMS/9-1-1) When you’re hot you sweat more than normal, so you need to drink more to replace the water your body is losing. Drink plenty of cool fluids, even if you do not feel thirsty, but avoid caffeine and alcohol. They can cause dehydration, which stops your body from controlling its temperature properly. Preventing Heat-Related Emergencies Drink plenty of cool fluids — this is the most important step you can take. Avoid being outside during the hottest part of the day. Know the humidex rating — it combines the temperature and humidity to indicate how hot, humid weather feels to the average person. Wear light, loose clothing to let air circulate and heat escape and always wear a hat. Apply sunscreen (with SPF 15 or higher) as sunburned skin reduces the body’s ability to cool itself. Slow down your activities as it gets hotter and don’t work, exercise, or play for too long at a time. Take a lot of breaks in a cool or shady area to let your body cool off. This will help if you do need to be outside when it’s really hot.

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First Aid Tips Heat-related emergencies

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 31, 2018 09:45
Heat-related emergencies occur when the body becomes dehydrated, which may result in an increased body temperature. Heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke, can happen to anyone who stays in the summer heat and sun for too long. Young children, the elderly, those with chronic illnesses such as heart disease, and those taking certain medications can become ill in hot, humid weather faster than healthy adults. It is important for everyone enjoying the outdoors to know how to prevent heat emergencies, recognize when someone has been in the heat for too long, and be able to provide help when needed. The Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Emergencies Cramps or muscle tightening, usually in the legs and abdomen but they can be in other parts of the body Headache Nausea Dizziness, weakness, and feeling faint Skin that is redder or paler than usual, or moist skin Rapid shallow breathing Irritable, bizarre, or aggressive behaviour How to Help Move the person to a cooler location Give the person cool water to drink in sips Have the person loosen any tight clothing Fan the person Put cool water on the person’s skin If the person’s condition is severe, put covered ice packs in each armpit and on the back of the person’s neck Call for help (EMS/9-1-1) When you’re hot you sweat more than normal, so you need to drink more to replace the water your body is losing. Drink plenty of cool fluids, even if you do not feel thirsty, but avoid caffeine and alcohol. They can cause dehydration, which stops your body from controlling its temperature properly. Preventing Heat-Related Emergencies Drink plenty of cool fluids — this is the most important step you can take. Avoid being outside during the hottest part of the day. Know the humidex rating — it combines the temperature and humidity to indicate how hot, humid weather feels to the average person. Wear light, loose clothing to let air circulate and heat escape and always wear a hat. Apply sunscreen (with SPF 15 or higher) as sunburned skin reduces the body’s ability to cool itself. Slow down your activities as it gets hotter and don’t work, exercise, or play for too long at a time. Take a lot of breaks in a cool or shady area to let your body cool off. This will help if you do need to be outside when it’s really hot.

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Safety Program Development

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 17, 2018 10:23

Victory Safety and Training is now offering Safety Program Development/Assessment to help you ensure your company is compliant with applicable regulations. If your company may require these services or you would like to know more please give us a call to book your assessment.

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Confidential, Personal Testing

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 3, 2018 15:50
Confidential, Personal Testing When you need to know the truth, plain and simple. We fully appreciate the issues around privacy and timing. Every case is managed in a professional, confidential, non-judgmental manner. We book same-day appointments.

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General Mine Safety Awareness (GMSA) is a 24-hour training

posted by Victory Safety    |   May 3, 2018 15:31
Mine Safety Classroom Training General Mine Safety Awareness (GMSA) is a 24-hour training course required for any contractor working on a mine site in Saskatchewan as of June 30, 2018. This is a Saskatchewan Mining Association (SMA) requirement. The program provides an overview of mine safety through 13 modules: 1. Saskatchewan Mining Regulations Employment Act 2. Hazard recognition 3. Personal protective equipment 4. Safe use of hand and power tools 5. Safe use of scaffolding and ladders 6. Controlled energy 7. Fire safety 8. Environmental safety 9. Reporting incidents 10. Ground control awareness 11. Self-rescue techniques 12. Asbestos awareness 13. Fit for duty and drug and alcohol testing The course is delivered over three days. Additional courses may be scheduled according to demand.

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General Mine Safety Awareness classes are filling up fast BOOK YOUR SPOT SOON

posted by Victory Safety    |   April 27, 2018 19:49

Get a head start to work on the mine sites by getting your GMSA class ahead of the rush. Classes in Saskatoon, Esterhazy, Regina or your location if you have a group. For more information give us a call

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General Mine Safety Awareness (GMSA)

posted by Victory Safety    |   April 5, 2018 12:13
Here's just a bit of info. on General Mine Safety Awareness (GMSA) which is a new program that is becoming mandatory on most Saskatchewan mine sites. And if you want to get a leg up on mine site work opportunities you can get a head start by taking this course GMSA is a 24-hour training course required for any contractor working on a mine site in Saskatchewan as of June 30, 2018 or September 30, 2018 depending on site. This is a Saskatchewan Mining Association (SMA) requirement. Partnership to create common provincial training standards for contractors at SMA sites "For contractors, this will mean one set of training standards reducing repetitive training, saving time and facilitating mobility between SMA member sites This course is now available from Victory Safety and Training in Saskatoon, Esterhazy, Regina or at your location for a public group. Additional courses such as confined space entry, fall protection, hoisting and rigging safety among others will be rolled out as they become available. The CMI is working with approved third-party training providers (ie. Victory Safety and Training ) to ensure that the standardized training is available throughout Saskatchewan.

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“interesting Drug and Alcohol testing read”

posted by Victory Safety    |   February 8, 2018 09:03
Legalization of Cannabis Presents Conundrum for Canadian Military February 1, 2018 By DATAC Questions are arising in the Canadian army, navy, air force, and special forces as the July 2018 legalization of cannabis looms. Since the Spring of 2017, military experts have been assessing their drug and alcohol policies in advance of the legislation that will see legal medical and recreational use of cannabis come into effect across the country. “We’re concerned about how folks will be able to do their job,” Lt.-Gen. Chuck Lamarre has said, “And we are concerned about folks who have the challenges of operating heavy equipment, weaponry, who are on call on a regular basis to go and do things, like our [search and rescue] technicians.” At this point, and relying on scientific rationale, Lamarre is prepared to “recommend or propose control measures” for the drug. The military has already limited impairment substances in some instances, including the consumption of alcohol by personnel stationed in Afghanistan. Just like in private companies across Canada, the Canadian military has also designated certain roles and work within the armed forces as “safety-sensitive,” and has experienced lobbying by senior commanders to expand drug and alcohol testing, particularly in these sectors. But Lamarre has stated that due to legal rights considerations, the military will need to be careful in how it applies random drug testing procedures. Because of its management of potentially violent and destructive machinery, the Canadian Armed Forces occupies a unique position within the framework of drug and alcohol policy, but Lamarre has still requested that health research help form any testing restrictions, and is specifically interested in determining “the impact of marijuana … on the developing brain,” since the hiring range for the Canadian military is between 18-25 years of age. Additionally, Lamarre is looking into what legally defines cannabis impairment, a hotly contested subject as there is no current and government-approved technology that shows definitive roadside testing results for marijuana. “How do you deal with that?” Lamarre asks. “Is there a testing technology that is coming around the corner?” Lamarre also faces the impact of potential cannabis sales in military mess halls, which are currently licensed to sell alcohol.

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Interesting Drug and alcohol testing read

posted by Victory Safety    |   January 18, 2018 13:59
Toronto police chief considering drug testing for officers January 18, 2018 By Astra Hemming After last year’s fentanyl overdose death of Const. Michael Thompson, 37, an officer working undercover in the Toronto Police Force drug squad, Police Chief Mark Saunders is considering drug testing for the city’s officers. “I don’t want to lose any officers to anything, especially drugs of any kind and if there are things that we can do to reduce that, then I’m very interested in that,” Saunders said during a year-end interview. Saunders insists that introducing drug testing isn’t motivated by an effort to catch officers out, but says that it is his responsibility to address any issues arising from the danger of officers working in law enforcement under the influence of drugs. Saunders has been seeking drug testing advice from police chiefs in other major cities, and has established an internal team within the Toronto Police Force to review the gathered information and plot out the procedure should the TPF undertake similar measures. More than ten years ago, when Judge George Ferguson suggested that officers in “high-risk” jobs should be subject to random drug testing, the police board at the time did not take on his suggestions after opposition was raised by the Toronto Police Association. Saunders, a former undercover drug officer himself, sees the loss of Const. Michael Thompson as part of the national opioid crisis, which caused 68 deaths in Toronto in 2017, compared to only 7 the year before. He said he would like to see more preventative measures in place to understand how so many “normal” people become addicted to the drug. Over the years, Saunders has lost friends to substance abuse “and I can tell you I’m a lot less judgmental than I was 35 years ago when I joined (the service). It can happen to anybody.”

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